Designing spaces
for new stories

About

We are an award-winning Landscape Architecture, Urban Design and Public Art practice based in St. Louis. We work with a variety of clients including universities, institutions, corporations, communities and individuals - at scales ranging from intimate landscapes to large-scale urban plans.

We bring a careful attention to detail to each project, as well as a desire to do great work and the goal of creating innovative and impactful landscapes that help make a happier, healthier and more inspired world.

Arbolope Studio is a MBE and WBE firm certified in the City of St. Louis. We believe in creating enduring relationships with our clients and community and we love what we do.

East End Central Landscape
The Lofts of Washington University
El Agua Y La UTPL
Mobility Framework Masterplan
Throop Drive One-Way
Capital Projects Connector
East End Perimeter
Tower Grove Streetscape Vision
Strauss Park
Council Circle
St. Ferdinand Homes II Landscape
Krauss House Visitor Center
Knight Hall Welcome Court
Love Bank Park
Children's Play Garden
Jubilee Garden
"Places" Art on Campus Landscape
Weather Field No.2
Alpha Beer Garden
The Score, Art & Music Promenade
One Hundred
McMillan Hall, Throop Addition
4101 Laclede Amenity Deck
Central Plaza
More
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Team Members

We are design practitioners with a wide range of backgrounds including landscape architecture, urban design, sculpture, painting, horticulture, architecture and music.

L. Irene Compadre, PLA

Principal

L. Irene Compadre is the founding principal of Arbolope Studio. Irene has a background in musical composition, architecture, sculpture and scenic art which help inspire her work.

Irene holds a Master of Landscape Architecture degree with Honors and a Bachelor of Arts in Architecture degree from the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL). Irene is also adjunct faculty at WUSTL, teaching graduate level courses in Landscape Architecture, Architecture, and Urban Design.

#Vegetarian #Latinx #Paisajista #ABetterWorld

i@arbolope.com

Xiaoqing Qin, ASLA

Landscape Designer

Xiaoqing is a Master of Landscape Architecture graduate with honor at Washington University in St. Louis, with a background of landscape research and horticulture. She brings passion for design and technical expertise to the Arbolope Studio team.

Xiaoqing has worked on various local and international projects, participating in concept development through construction administration.  She is passionate about using landscape architecture as a catalyst to create joy and increase the value of urban spaces. She also believes in using design to highlight the unique cultural, ecological and artistic details of each site.

#FunCook #Cyclist #LandscapeSpeaks

xiaoqing@arbolope.com

Anu Samarajiva

Landscape + Urban Designer

Anu Samarajiva is a graduate of the Master of Urban Design and Master of Architecture programs at Washington University in St. Louis. She has a background in economics, community engagement and teaching, and is passionate about the power of public space and landscape to engage and sustain communities.

Anu brings passion for design, experience meeting client needs, and practical skills to the Arbolope Studio team.

#bikebuswalk4life #urbanism #heartSTL

anu@arbolope.com

Michael Powell

Marketing

Michael holds a BA from UC Santa Barbara and a MFA from the Sam Fox School of Design + Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, where he continues to teach as a lecturer in communication design. Specializing in branding, web design, and publication design, Michael works with the Arbolope team to craft brand standards and marketing materials.

Interested in authentic storytelling, Michael believes in the power of good design to shape a better future.

#designthatreveals #stl #maker

michael@arbolope.com

Lauren McDaniel

Intern

Lauren, a St. Louis native, is currently working on her Master of Landscape Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis. She holds a BS in Environmental Science from SLU and chose landscape architecture as a way to blend design, science, people, and research. Lauren is passionate about and interested in the intersection of native plants, ecological restoration, and playscapes.

#plantsrule #animallover #geologyrocks

intern@arbolope.com

Sam Bell-Hart

Intern

Sam is a Master of Architecture student at Washington University in St. Louis, with a background in woodworking and furniture making. He believes in an interdisciplinary approach to design and is happiest when building things for people.

#maker #cook #amateurgardener

intern@arbolope.com

Arbolope Studio

An award-winning landscape architecture, urban design and art practice interested in creating innovative and impactful landscapes that contribute to making a happier, healthier and more inspired world.
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Certifications

Certified Women Business Enterprise

Certified Minority Business Enterprise


In the News



Compadre gives CAP Lecture - Ball State University

100 North Breaks Ground - STL Today
East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

East End Central Landscape

The East End Central Landscape Project is the largest capital investment in the recent history of the Danforth Campus of Washington University in St. Louis.

The project is a transformation of the main public face of the University from Bookings Hall, the iconic hilltop building (west), to Skinker Boulevard (east), Forest Park Parkway (north) and Forsyth Boulevard (south).

The East End Central Landscape includes two new engineering buildings, a new building for the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a new public entrance and expansion of the Kemper Art Museum, an outdoor sculpture garden, a Welcome Center and a Multipurpose Student Hub. The project also removes all surface parking lots on the eastern portion of the campus, replacing them with a large underground parking garage and limits vehicular access to three drop-off plazas at the campus perimeter.

The substantially improved Central Green Landscape regrades the east end topography, improving circulation and accessibility, provides more open area for formal and informal gatherings, replants the campus’ signature tree allée and provides a new network of clear pedestrian and bicycle paths.

Arbolope Studio has served as the local partner for Michael Versgason Landscape Architects.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

Central Plaza

The Central Plaza is an elevated space that connects the main entrances of Steinberg Hall and the Kemper Art Museum at the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts (SFS) at Washington University in St. Louis. “Fragmented Terrain” is an unbuilt design for the Central Plaza that proposes a creative, low-cost activation strategy to address infrastructure decay issues and create usable space for SFS students, faculty, visitors and staff.

“Fragmented Terrain” proposes capping areas of extreme surface decay with a ground mural, sculptural deck structures and two shade pavilions.

Painted bands of colors from the SFS logo, which represent the various schools and institutions within SFS, form an implied rectangular space at the center of the plaza.

The deck platforms occupy the interior of the square ground mural. Their shapes are a result of removing major circulation lines and “fragmenting” the resulting shapes to create interior areas for small gatherings. Users can sit around the square perimeter, gather in one of the interior areas with friends, and climb, sit or recline on the deck fragments.

This proposal also imagines the activation of the lower lawn area with improved access, an informal amphitheater space, new plantings and movable furniture.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

4101 Laclede Amenity Deck

4101 Laclede is an urban, mixed-use development located on the eastern edge of the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The building, sited at the intersection of Laclede Ave, a quiet residential street to the west and Sarah St, a more highly trafficked mixed-use corridor to the north and south, serves as a bridge programmatically and architecturally with the neighborhood.

The amenity deck, located on the second floor above street level retail, is a large communal outdoor area for residents that includes a swimming pool, jacuzzi, poolside seating, a fire pit, outdoor kitchens, large Cor-ten steel planters for trees and an activity lawn.

The plant palette for the Amenity Deck was selected to provide year round visual interest for those enjoining the deck in person or viewing the deck from units above.

Highly ornamental trees and ground covers provide bright colorful accents in spring and summer. Grasses along perimeter planters provide attractive color and texture through the year and provide privacy between the deck and adjacent private patio spaces. A Hornbeam tree hedge with a Liriope under-story around the north and western edges of the deck screens the deck from the adjacent property and alleyway, protects the deck from northern harsh winter winds and also provides a seasonally interesting, elegant backdrop for the deck.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

McMillan Hall, Throop Addition

The McMillan Hall, Throop Addition is a new one-story College of Arts and Sciences pool lecture hall facility and Anthropology lab at Washington University in St. Louis.

Tucked between existing historic buildings and built concurrent with the new Olin Business School expansion, this structure quietly nests into the existing hillside and is topped with an intensive green roof. Cascading stairs from the Hilltop Campus frame McMillan Hall,Throop Addition and lead pedestrians down to Throop Drive with the green-roof functioning as a mid-elevation secret garden and gathering space.

The major criteria for the Landscape was to: improve the pedestrian experience along Throop Drive with generous sidewalks and shade trees; provide a new multipurpose outdoor gathering space; minimize the projects impervious area with a large green roof; create a bike parking node; and contribute to the target of LEED gold sustainable design.

The Roof Garden includes a central multipurpose lawn surrounded by wide planting beds of shrubs, grasses and perennials. The plant palette consists of native and adapted plants selected for long seasonal interest and low to medium water demand. The project also includes a demonstration garden, managed by the Anthropology Department, of plants used for food, crafts, recreation and medicine by the indigenous people of the St. Louis area.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

One Hundred

Arbolope Studio was engaged to provide streetscape, landscape and amenity deck design services for the iconic One Hundred residential tower designed by high-profile architect Studio Gang.

Located at the corner of Kingshighway and West Pine, the 36-story tower provides views to Forest Park to the west, the Gateway Arch to the east and surrounding view of Central West End and WashU Medical Campus/BJC. The tower includes ground-level retail, an enclosed parking garage, residential apartments, and residential amenities including an amenity deck.

The Ground-Level Landscape Plan includes a considered streetscape with street trees, street buffer planting beds, generous building planting beds, a tree grove, bike parking, and specialty sidewalk and cafe pavement.

The residential amenity deck on the south-eastern corner of the seventh floor includes a pool, fire-pit, game lawn and outdoor seating areas.

To assist collaboration with Studio Gang and the client, Arbolope Studio created a Material Booklet for products and materials that included imagery, information, samples, installation guides, details, finishes, plant species, colors and cost information.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

The Score, Art & Music Promenade

The Score is the winning concept for the Art and Music Promenade (AMP) located along a highly pedestrian alleyway in Grand Center, St. Louis’ historic art and music district.

The Score is a translation of the alley’s building facades into musical notation. Bands of color, acting as abstracted notes, take their dimension and placement from alleyway windows, doors, walls and wires. These notes, flowing down the building walls onto the ground and across painted stanza lines, create a site-specific musical expression that can be experienced synesthetically by Promenade visitors.

The key challenge for this project was to create a landscape that emulated the ephemeral quality of the musical experience. A musical work changes significantly based on a venue’s acoustics, instrument quality and even climate conditions. To this end, the project team developed a thermo-luminescent paint that changes colors based on temperature and emits light at night. On a warm day, or responding to human touch, the paint appears one color while on a cold day or in the shade the paint transforms into another.

As temperatures shift, people interact with the space, day turns to night and seasons turn - the promenade’s color palette will shift, creating an ever changing, dynamic and engaging landscape that can be enjoyed by Grand Center residents and visitors.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Alpha Beer Garden

With its move from Washington Avenue in downtown to Fyler Avenue in the Tower Grove South neighborhood of St. Louis, Alpha Brewing Company upgraded to a much larger venue with space for a tap room, event space, production brewery, and most excitingly, room for an outdoor beer garden. The new patio and beer garden, nestled between the tap room and brewery buildings and perched above the street, is envisioned as a true garden - a space surrounded by shade and lush plantings for visitors to enjoy seasonally.

In keeping with the nautical theme of the interior murals, the patio space was designed as a series of circular “bubble” rooms that create distinct spaces within the patio’s small footprint. The bubble rooms include a building side food ordering and seating area, a garden seating zone and a separated fire pit node. The bubbles are distinguished using various concrete finishes: smooth, integral color, exposed gravel and stamped concrete.

The patio also has planter bed bubbles that provide screening and shade between distinct areas. These planted bubbles and the curvilinear perimeter planting bed use native and low-maintenance groundcovers and grasses to provide screening and enclosure. Shade and additional visual interest are provided by a mix of Paperbark Maple, River Birch, Redbuds and Serviceberry trees – all trees with interesting bark textures and/or vibrant fall color.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2

Weather Field No. 2 is the second iteration of a site-specific artwork by the Chicago-based artist Inigo Mañglano-Ovalle. The sculpture consists of 46-stainless steel poles, each topped with a weather vane and an anemometer, arranged in a highly ordered diamond pattern that comes together to produce an unpredictable microclimate within the installation space. The sculpture is prominently placed at the center of Millstone Plaza, an important northern entrance to Washington University’s campus.

The sculpture is set within a “composed field” of monolithic liriope plants, forming an elegant evergreen foundation from which the poles appear to weightlessly emerge.

The careful alignment of the plants reflects the geometric sculptural layout, while also introducing subtle variations in height, color and density that are natural for plant material. Bursts of color in the spring from tall allium bulbs and in late summer from liriope contribute to the dynamic quality of the piece by giving it seasonal visual interest.

Additional project components such as a thin stainless steel metal edge, sculptural lighting, a drainage strategy, and complex structural elements were highly coordinated to subtly but effectively function within the tightly packed site without detracting from the artist’s vision for the sculpture.

Weather Field No. 2